Meningioma

Meningioma is a tumour that arises from the covering layers (meninges) of the brain and spinal cord. Meningiomas occur more commonly in females, and typically between the ages of 40-70. The tumour can grow almost anywhere within the cranial cavity (or spinal canal), including around the brain stem or the spinal cord as the covering layers exist around all of these areas.

Meningioma

Generally speaking, most meningiomas are slow growing and considered non-cancerous. Sometimes these are found incidentally on scans that are done for other purposes. Whether tumours present with or without symptoms, a specialist at Neurosurgery Tasmania will assess the significance of the tumour, its imaging characteristics and your individual situation, and make an appropriate treatment recommendation.

If the tumour causes symptoms, is large in size, causes swelling or pressure on the adjacent brain, or shows evidence of growth over time, then surgery is likely to be required.
If the tumour is of the slow growing variety then surgery can be curative.
A small percentage of meningiomas can be fast growing and show cancerous features, including invasion to other tissues including the adjacent brain or skull. Patients with these tumours may require other treatments such as radiation after surgery.

Surgeons at Neurosurgery Tasmania have extensive experience in managing patients with meningiomas and will be able to give you expert advice and, if necessary, surgical treatment.